2015Initiatives

The Texas A&M Foundation matches your interests to funding priorities, no matter what your passion. Below are a few of our major fundraising initiatives for the coming year.

Music Activities Center

Give Aggie musicians the home they deserve.

A new Music Activities Center will accommodate more than 1,300 student musicians who participate in bands, choirs and orchestras at Texas A&M University. The state-of-the-art facility will include an artificial 100-yard turf field for the 400-plus member Fightin’ Texas Aggie Band, soundproof practice rooms, a copious amount of locker storage and four rehearsal halls equipped with unmatched acoustics and adequate space. The building replaces the E.V. Adams Band Hall, which can no longer safely accommodate student musicians.

The university will fund half of the $40 million necessary to construct the facility, while the other $20 million will come from private support through the Texas A&M Foundation.

To learn more, visit the Music Activities Center website or contact Cindy Munson ’99, regional director of major gifts.

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The Gardens at Texas A&M University

Build Texas A&M’s future backyard.

The Gardens at Texas A&M University project is a planned transformation of a 46-acre area of West Campus that will include an outdoor classroom, open-air pavilion, barn, grove amphitheater, demonstration gardens, rose gardens and tree-lined nature trails. The park-like improvements will help showcase the College of Agriculture and Life Science’s commitment to feeding a growing global population with dwindling natural resources; introduce K-12 students to agriculture and the natural sciences; and provide a place for relaxation amid natural surroundings.

To learn more, visit gardens.tamu.edu or contact Steve Blomstedt ’83, assistant vice president for development. 

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Institute for Advanced Study

Bring world-renowned faculty to Texas A&M.

The Texas A&M University Institute for Advanced Study attracts National Academy and Nobel-prize caliber researchers—like Dr. Yuri Oganessian, an expert in experimental nuclear physics—to the university to enrich Texas A&M’s intellectual climate and educational experiences. Each year, the Institute invites a number of nationally and internationally prominent faculty fellows to pursue advanced study at the Institute in collaboration with faculty and student scholars at Texas A&M. The Institute advances research productivity by combining the resources of a major tier-one research institution with distinguished faculty from a range of disciplines.

To learn more, visit tias.tamu.edu. To find out how you can support the Texas A&M University Institute for Advanced Study, contact Carl Jaedicke ’73, vice president for principal gifts.

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25 by 25 Initiative

Advance engineering education.

Texas A&M has long been an engineering education powerhouse. Now, the university is stepping forward to address the critical state and national need for engineers through an innovative sustainable and systemic change to its educational enterprise.

The 25 by 25 Initiative is a transformational program to increase access for qualified students to pursue education at Texas A&M University to an enrollment of 25,000 engineering students by 2025. Guided by three principles, the initiative aims to better prepare students to meet future needs of the engineering marketplace; increase accessibility to engineering education at all levels; and deliver engineering education in a cost effective and affordable manner.

Learn more by visiting the 25 by 25 Initiative website or by contacting Andy Acker, assistant vice president for development.

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